The Raccoon

Anyone who has read my blog knows about my lost cat, Charlie. He got out six weeks ago and we’ve had potential sightings, but he’s still missing.

Setting a live animal trap is one way of getting a lost animal back. We bought two traps from Tractor Supply Company and placed them wherever there was a sighting in the neighborhood. The traps are effective. We caught cats, but none were Charlie. When my husband opened the door of the trap, the cat shot out and was gone in an instant.

Two weeks ago, we caught a possum. He was happy with his location, so my husband had to dump him out.

Over the weekend, a raccoon went after the jack mackerel we use for bait. And my husband was out of town. I neared the trap, thinking I’d let the poor critter out and he would shoot out like a cat, or he’d have to be dumped out like the possum. Wrong!

I got within three feet of the trap and the raccoon snarled and growled. He gave me the impression that he was not happy with his situation and he didn’t care for me, either.

So, I called Animal Control and got an emergency number from their answering machine. The number connected to Williamson County 9-1-1. The operator was nice but she told me an animal emergency is when one is attacking me or my pet. Otherwise, the officers don’t work on Sunday. Who knew?

After getting numerous busy signals this morning, I got the Animal Control dispatcher. She told me I shouldn’t set traps on weekends. No s**t! Anyway, she put me on the list for pick up.

The officer came out and I showed her the trap and raccoon. The trap was not in the same place where I left it Sunday morning. Neither was it upright. No wonder the little guy looked happy to see the officer. He was tired!

The officer took the trap and told me I can retrieve it later in the day. My concern now is if that raccoon comes back with friends dressed as ninja warriors. I don’t think I’ll go outside after dark.

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7 thoughts on “The Raccoon

  1. Mary Ingmire says:

    Those raccoon ninjas are what I’m worried about. They come with natural masks. We think Charlie has found a home somewhere, but hope one day he’ll wander back here.

  2. mike Helms says:

    Raccoons are far from ninjas. They are however, like heroin addicts. If you do anything nice for them they are back the next evening wanting more. If you don’t cough up the goodies they start Jonesing and getting pushy. They usually return with all of their family in tow to share in the bounty. They are truly one of God’s nastiest critters. Good Luck with them.

  3. Mary Ingmire says:

    It kind of makes you wonder what useful purpose they serve. My only real previous encounter with raccoons was at our place in Canada. They manage to empty bird feeders – even hummingbird feeders – and we don’t dare leave peanuts out for squirrels. I don’t know about Canadian raccoons, but the ones in middle Tennessee have a reputation for carrying rabies. That in itself makes me nervous.

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